Meta-Commentary

Anemone Fish

Posted in politics, work by Adrian Arroyo on October 1, 2013

Speaker Boehner sells himself as a kind of anemone fish: only he can survive among the stinging tentacles of his party. Today, he shares the fish’s pigment and its epithet.

(David Foster Wallace circled words in his dictionary. I’m using each of them in a sentence, moving alphabetically from “Ablative Absolute” to “witenagemot.”)

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Androsterone

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on September 1, 2013

Rejected Movie Pitches–Two Nazis and 4,500 Gallons of Distilled Male Urine: the Androsterone Story.

(David Foster Wallace circled words in his dictionary. I’m using each of them in a sentence, moving alphabetically from “Ablative Absolute” to “witenagemot.”)

Anecdotage

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on August 31, 2013

Data is a young man’s game. The older we get, the more we rely on our anecdotage.

(David Foster Wallace circled words in his dictionary. I’m using each of them in a sentence, moving alphabetically from “Ablative Absolute” to “witenagemot.”)

Ament

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on July 30, 2012

Legislators use amendments to court aments within the chamber as well as without.

(David Foster Wallace circled words in his dictionary. I’m using each of them in a sentence, moving alphabetically from “Ablative Absolute” to “witenagemot.”)

Alpestrine

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on July 24, 2012

Accustomed to a form of alpestrine commentary that sees smoke but no fire, we’re now content to ignore the particularities of our situation and speculate on the particulates.

(David Foster Wallace circled words in his dictionary. I’m using each of them in a sentence, moving alphabetically from “Ablative Absolute” to “witenagemot.”)

Algolagnia

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on August 15, 2011

Whatever their reasons for sampling it, both groups soon discovered that fried butter was less a food and more a form of gustatory algolagnia.

(The twelfth part of an ongoing series in which I attempt to use a word circled in David Foster Wallace’s American Heritage Dictionary appropriately.)

Alfresco

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on August 15, 2011

At the Iowa State Fair, fried butter alfresco proved surprisingly popular among reporters and candidates alike–the former drawn to its novelty, the latter to its authenticity.

(The eleventh part of an ongoing series in which I attempt to use a word circled in David Foster Wallace’s American Heritage Dictionary appropriately.)

Aleatory

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on August 4, 2011

The audacity of hope turned out to be a surprisingly aleatory proposition.

(The tenth part of an ongoing series in which I attempt to use a word circled in David Foster Wallace’s American Heritage Dictionary appropriately.)

Ailanthus

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on August 4, 2011

Drained of their metaphorical significance, Williamsburg’s Ailanthus trees linger on.

(The ninth part of an ongoing series in which I attempt to use a word circled in David Foster Wallace’s American Heritage Dictionary appropriately.)

Agrapha

Posted in work by Adrian Arroyo on August 2, 2011

Though the balanced budget amendment was destined for failure in the Senate, such constitutional agrapha had become the lower chamber’s stock in trade.

(The eighth part of an ongoing series in which the writer attempts to use a word circled in David Foster Wallace’s American Heritage Dictionary appropriately.)